Politics
Politics
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Studying political science

Are you interested in politics and you want to study political science, but you don’t want to become a politician? No problem, because the subject offers far more career opportunities than many think. You can work as a diplomat, journalist or speaker after your studies. During your studies, you acquire important knowledge about how political systems work and how political action shapes different states and societies.

What requirements do I have to meet?

Since you can study political science or political science almost exclusively at universities, you usually need the general university entrance qualification. Some courses are also restricted by a numerus clausus (NC). The NC values refer to your grade average in the Abitur and are currently between 1.6 and 2.8for political science. You will receive detailed information about your application for a place at the study counselling of the respective political science courses.

Is political science the right study for me?

Do you think about whether you should study political science? You like to have political discussions and watch the news every day? These are good conditions, but they are not enough on their own. You should not underestimate the high level of a political science degree.

In your studies you read a lot and deal with the theoretical background of political actions and events such as elections and demonstrations. Since global political ties are also important in their studies, a lot of specialist literature is written in English. So you should have a good knowledge of English. The philosophical foundations of political and social theories can be complicated in some cases. Abstract imagination and an analytical mindset are very helpful in comprehending the texts.

An interdisciplinary study

Studying political science now also means a lot to be reckoned with. Statistical analyses and mathematical calculations are increasingly sought-after political research tools. For example, you calculate the economic power of a particular country or create sociological surveys. The range of courses offered by most political science courses is very interdisciplinary. You will learn content from the fields of sociology, social science and philosophy.

Depending on the university, the range of courses on offer varies due to the many possible subject areas. Before starting your studies, it is best to inform yourself about the content of the course with the respective study advice.

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Occupation & Career

Political scientists find employment in various fields of activity. The range of potential employers extends to:

  • Political associations
  • Non-governmental Organizations (NGOs)
  • Media
  • Universities
  • Public administration
  • Foundations
  • Unions
  • Educational institutions and schools

Salary

Because the activities are so different, the salary of political scientists is not uniform either. It makes a big difference whether you work in municipal politics or as a speaker in a large foundation. In principle, however, the earning potential is good. Depending on your employer, you can expect a gross monthly salary of €2,000 to €3,300. With increasing professional experience, salaries of €6,000 gross per month or more are possible, depending on the position. Top wages of up to €14,000 gross per month earn diplomats with difficult assignments.

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Importance Of Social Media In Election Campaign

Research by The Best Social Media platform among the 30,000 Instagram followers shows that 15 percent of this group follows a politician, and only 13 percent a political party on social media. If you want more to become famous you can ‘buy Instagram likes cheap‘ to attract more followers on your Instagram.

Never before have political parties made so much use of social media during election campaigns

We not only look at Belgium, but also at the US, France, Germany, and the Netherlands. Facebook and Twitter are the ideal media for politicians to communicate directly (without the intervention of the press) with the voter. Personal opinions and realizations, but also party propaganda can be sent unfiltered. But perhaps more importantly: they can enter into a conversation with their target group. We are convinced that social media will not only bring politicians closer to citizens but will also help them to interact. Social media allows politicians to share their opinion, expertise, or vision on themes that are alive in their city or municipality. In this way, they quickly become more relevant to their voting audience. By using social media (not only during the campaigns) the election candidates become more authentic and they can also reach that younger, more difficult target group. The more well-known, the lesser, the more (preference) votes. That’s what politicians can achieve with social media. Do voters also know the politician online? Do they (regularly) see him or her pass by in their timeline? What image do they have of the politician?

Offers perspectives for a better (more participatory) policy, building credibility, and for a better campaign

On March 12, 2016, we came across an interesting tweet on Twitter that we would like to share with you: “A good politician campaigns for 6 years, you have to earn your voters, every day. Do what you say, say what you do.” Social media are just the right tools for this, simple but essential! Research also shows that social media has a positive influence on the number of preference votes that candidates received. Candidates who use social media during the municipal election campaign receive 7 percent more votes than candidates who did not. In comparison, rising one place on the electoral list produces more votes (namely 53 percent more votes). The research shows that the use of social media has a positive effect. On the other hand, this effect should not be exaggerated. The voters who will be reached directly through social media are still limited. When politicians make full use of and deploy their social media channels, they are not only reachable online, they also become more relevant to their constituents. As a result, they see the politician’s commitment and vision in a systematic way, so that they know better what he stands for. Finally, social media provide more online visibility, which only enhances the credibility of a local politician. Politicians do not build credibility in one day, not even during a campaign period. It’s something they have to work on in the long term. It is therefore essential to start early and to deal with it consciously. This way they can reap the benefits during a campaign period.

In addition, journalists also play a huge role in furthering the influence of social media. Journalists follow that social media and many politicians as a ‘news source’. Research shows that journalists often cite social media messages, such as tweets, in their articles. In this way, tweets reach a much larger audience and a candidate receives a lot of publicity. Scientists, therefore, emphasize that social media through traditional media may have a much greater influence than social media on its own. In this way, we get a nice interaction between social and traditional media. Publicity and attention are usually always positive and are likely to lead to more votes. Because as we already wrote: the more famous, the more loved, the more preferential votes. Especially in local elections: people vote for people. There are fewer undecided voters at the time of voting.

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Is Everything Political Or Non-Political?

You can read the title of my weblog in two ways. Yes or no with the brackets. How you read this may depend on how you are in public administration or how you view politics. And that is not very strange. Both movements occur among administrators and politicians.

 

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Everything is political
On the one hand, there are the politicians for whom everything is political. On the one hand, they make use of compelling visions, but also regularly make use of pre-hopeless motions. After all, symbolic politics is also political. Or make politics of agendas and procedures. Policy continuity is not important to them. If it is more convenient to change course, it will. Everything is political. This is often tiring and disruptive and that is sometimes the very goal of the politicians involved. For them, politics is not the means, but the end.

Not everything is political
On the other hand, there are politicians who emphasize that not everything is political. For them, there are fixed values, fundamental principles, and lines within which a politician operates and which people want to adhere to. Governance continuity is of paramount importance to these politicians. They name subjects and seize moments that transcend politics. They put the rule of law and good governance first in their actions and they also want to keep the debate in order. These politicians apply a kind of political hygiene.

Consistency of policy
Neither of these two styles is left or right. These styles can be found on both sides of the political spectrum. Yet the style in which ‘everything is political’ is dominant is not good for our country, provinces and municipalities. Inhabitants need stability, reliability, perspective, and trust-inspiring leadership. Not a street fight or ‘village politics’. This requires a certain consistency of policy and a certain distance from the issues of the day. And exactly this also applies to the relationships between the levels of government.

Dealing with administrative structure and financial system agreements
Financial and administrative relationships require care, consistency, and restraint. Yes, political principles prevail over technocratic implementation. Yes, that can and must be tinkered with a certain regularity. Yes, system agreements must also go along and be adapted to the times in which we live. However, taking an opportunistic approach to administrative structure and financial system agreements quickly leads to cluttered up and – political or financial – accidents and, at some point, an inevitable failure of policy or problems in implementation. Everyone knows from their own domestic experience: if you do not regularly clean up the shed and just mess around, there is only one option waiting at any time: the big cleaning. There is much more to it than just keeping it in order.

Decentralization and the financial system
In the meantime, the sounds are getting louder: the decentralization in its current form is stagnating (SCP) or, according to some, rattling on all sides(Foundation decentralized administration). In addition to all the otherwise good analyzes that apply to this, in my view, this also has everything to do with the hasty transfer in 2015, the enormous budgetary interventions that went with it, and the political capriciousness with which the decentralization had to contend in recent years on both policy and financial level. Depending on the political whims, interim interventions in policy were or were not taken. And depending on what did or did not ‘work out’ politically, they decided on (usually no) money. Too little policy space for municipalities and too little money for the requested task performance. That does not go well for long. Meanwhile, the administrative and financial system is squeaking and creaking at the seams.